Tag Archives: countryside

Summer Time and the stitching is…

The stitching is mostly being fitted around the daughters on school holiday ūüôā

We all went to the Last Shift Banner picnic on Saturday afternoon. It was great to see the school banner on display with its bigger brothers and sisters from local collieries!

The picnic was in full swing when we got there, with brass band, folk singing, rapper dancing and shuggy boats. A wonderful way to finish off the festival.

So now its time to get on and develop new work for Autumn shows and exhibitions. I’m really taken with the idea of doing some pieces based on hedgerow flowers. Has anyone else noticed how beautiful, and prolific, the wildflowers are this year? It would be lovely to capture them in stitch and cloth. I’ve been sketching and photographing for a while so I think its time to start experimenting now. Perhaps with soluble fabric as I think the spaces and layers between the plants are important.

These lovely flowers are on the bike route into town, a great border between the bike and foot paths!

I’ve had some time out to see the textiles art that local branches of the Embroiderers’ Guild have displayed to celebrate Capability Brown’s 300th birthday. The teatowel display at Gibside looked gorgeous, blowing in the breeze in the walled garden. There are more pieces on display in the chapel, and another collection at Wallington too. Well done to all my friends taking part in this – we had fun spotting all your work!

 

New Beginning and a Sculpture Garden

What to do on a cold, grey Bank Holiday? I know РStart preparing for a new community project!

I’ve been commissioned to produce a banner with the children of a primary school. The banner will be in the style of a Miners Banner as the village is celebrating 50 years since the closure of the village pit – the main mine having been open for 50 years from 1906 to 1966. The banner must be of a size that the children can manage to carry and the idea is to celebrate life in a pit village, rather than the work of the pit itself.

Measuring dyes

Measuring chemicals

 

Dye bottles

Measuring chemicals

So the dyes are ready, the fixing solutions are mixed and the fabric squares are prepared. The youngest children in the school are going to colour the fabrics that we’ll be using, then I’m aiming to use different print processes with the older children.

Each group will have a different decade as the theme for their work – 1906, 1916,1926,1936,1946,1956 and 1966. They’ll look at the culture of each decade and let that influence their ideas. So, I’m busy sourcing music, fashion and art from each era to get them thinking!

Its not all work though! Yesterday we took some time out to visit Cheeseburn Sculpture Garden. It is a beautiful place. Originally a farm linked to Hexham Priory it now has gorgeous gardens with sculpures placed throughout. Wandering through flower gardens, walled gardens and woodland gardens you come across stunning sculptures and sound installations.

These two can be found on the edge of the woodland garden. Some of our party found novel ways of viewing the sculptures…

DSCF3707

I was overcome with Wisteria envy…

Maybe one day my wisteria will achieve such profusion!

Alongside the sculptures and beautiful gardens there are lots of curious and intriguing objects to discover in ancient outhouses and dusty corners…

Rusted metal and moss strewn surfaces all setting creative ideas going…just look at these rusty old bellows…

I love the colour and those strong circles contrasting with that crumbling wood. Think I may have to return with a sketchbook – do check the website though because the Sculpture Garden is only open for a few weekends each year – and yes they do a lovely cup of tea and slice of cake!

Just a few ideas…

After my little jaunt up the coast, I’ve been trying out ideas in my sketchbook – I brought a kelp root back from the beach and I must get it sketched because to be honest its a bit stinky!

One reason I’m not doing so many markets at the moment is because I want to develop some new work (the other reason being the My Journey project I’m also documenting in this blog.) I have a feeling that these new pieces might get quite big, in comparison to other work I’ve been doing recently. So, I’m trying out compositions, colours and processes in my sketchbook. I’m trying to practice what I preach – don’t settle for the first idea, do get out and draw on location, play and experiment. Often, I find, that deadlines mean I skimp on some of these – so I’m giving myself a bit of time to get really stuck in to the research. I’ve got two new boards on my Pinterest¬†site Joan Eardley and Anne Redpath. I’m fascinated by how they use paint and want to try their sort of approach but with ¬†fabric and stitch.

(c) Anne Morrison; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Summer Grasses & Barley on the Clifftop Joan Eardley c1962

There’s so much life and energy in this painting. I love the layers, the marks and the use of colour. I think that I’m moving towards this in my own work as I develop themes and ideas.

Yesterday was such a beautiful Spring day, sunshine with some warmth! (Quite rare in the North of England at the moment!) so I treated myself to an afternoon in the garden with my sketch book. Just working on capturing the flowers that are starting to bloom. There are Bluebells still tightly clenched in buds and Magnolia Stellata starting to unfurl. Beautiful shapes and colour changes that are so subtle. I found out the Bluebells are also known as Endymion, after the youth put into an eternal sleep by the Greek Moon goddess Selene. I love these stories of how names arise, I store them in the¬†ideas cupboard in my brain ready to use when I’m trying to think of interesting titles for my work. But is ‘Land of Endymion’ a bit too romantic for a scene from my garden or the local park?!

DSCF3554

 

New work developing

I’ve been concentrating on smaller landscape pieces this week – here’s some pics…

IMG_0437.JPG

IMG_0436.JPG
These are preparation for ‘Along the Way’ a piece inspired by journeys through Scotland. I love the way houses and farmsteads hunker down amidst the hills. Often the trees look blasted and twisted by the wind and rain, forming shapes that stand out against the skyline as if they are stitching the clouds to the hills.

IMG_0440.JPG

Here it’s nearly complete but needs those trees to be added in. I’ve added texture with machine and hand stitching using wonderful Oliver Twist threads. The dry stone wall combines stitch with needle felted wool blanket fabric.

And here’s the final piece available now at Etsy

IMG_0212-0.JPG

Down on the Farm

A new piece in the Day Trippers series-might have to be renamed the weekenders!

Inspired by our little camping trip earlier this year when we stayed in a vintage caravan, the only cooking spot was a campfire, the view was fields as far as the eye could see, our neighbours were feathered or four legged and it was wonderful!

So, if you feel the need to slow down, take a cuppa, put your feet up and enjoy this view!

IMG_0198-0.JPG

IMG_0199-0.JPG

IMG_0200-0.JPG

I’m pleased with how the chickens turned out, mornings drawing in Pets Corner put to good use;)