Monthly Archives: December 2020

Stars for the Season

I read today that the best time to see a meteor shower could be next weekend – the Geminids will peak with about 120 meteors per hour being visible! I’m hoping for some clear skies so I can go out and see them.

This reminded me of the hospital arts project I’ve been working on lately, small craft project kits to help medical staff to unwind a little, my one involves making a garland of origami stars, I’ve put together kits and made a little video to go along with the instruction sheet – I’ll share that here!

I usually work one day a week in hospital arts but haven’t been able to do that since March, so the project I work for, Room for You.org.uk has been looking at ways we can still engage with patients and staff. We’ve made a few videos as a team, combining images and discussing progress over Zoom calls, these will be shared on our website soon. We’re working on other projects too. It’s not the same as actually being with people but it does feel good to be doing something that, we hope, will help people through these strange times.

So, why don’t you take a few minutes for yourself, grab some square sheets of paper and a pair of scissors and have a go – the stars look great as a garland but also as gift tags or tree decorations – try using different size squares and different types of paper too!

5 point origami stars
How to make 5 point stars from a square of paper

Responding to Landscape

Arran Coast, evening time.

A weekend workshop with Amanda Hislop gave me a big creative boost. Looking for the abstract in land and sea was the contrast I needed after many hours working on a detailed wild flower piece. I felt I was never going to finish with the tangle of text, leaves and stems but a change of focus gave me the impetus to complete ‘Vagabond Plants…’ in time for a http://www.fusiontextileartists.com exhibition in November. The exhibition will be at the Bailiffgate Museum in Alnwick until January 2021.

Vagabond Plants Content to share the meanest spot. Donna Cheshire October 2020

The workshop took place over Zoom, for a weekend in October. Amanda guided us and showed examples of her work ing methods. Now I am focussing on taking my interpretation of the workshop ideas from paper to textile. First to be completed is a piece mounted on driftwood. This is, I think, going to be the start of a new collection – Journey Mapping, exploring the landscape in a slightly more abstract way. I want to incorporate ideas and objects I find as I walk the land, whether that is here in the North East or in Scotland, although this year all Scottish pieces are inspired by memories of past visits – I haven’t been further North than Bamburgh this year ( but the sea swimming there was great!)

I am working with my preferred processes but interpreting images in a different way, trying to capture the mood and feel of a place rather than a clear visual representation. Here, strong grid marks relate to the division lines found on maps. I’m using hand stitch to soften some marks and also to build texture as with the gold yellow section shown below. Textures refer to the movement of the sea, debris on the shore, and rocks. This part of Arran has geological features known as the Dyke Swarm, long fingers of prehistoric rock, some complete with fossilised dinosaur footprints, that reach out into the sea. These rocks make many inlets along the shore, trapping seaweed, shells and driftwood but also providing lots of basking spots for seals. A walk of just a couple of miles can be filled with wildlife and beach combing ‘finds’.

As 2020 has given me a lot more studio time than usual, I’ve been backing up visual research and investigation with reading, this book, by Simon Barnes , has some wonderful, uncomplicated, advice on how to see more when out walking. I’ll definitely try some of his tips when I’m out next.